Other

Cocktails to Help Survive a Storm

Cocktails to Help Survive a Storm



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Weather the storm with some appropriately named drinks

If you find yourself in the unfortunate position of being smack in the middle of Hurricane Irene's path, chances are you're preparing to stock up on provisions at the store. Might as well make a pit stop at the liquor shop too while you're at it. Because let's be honest, in the face of ferocious winds and pounding rain who isn't going to need a little something to take the edge off?

Keep the mood light and show the storm who's boss with these tasty, natural disaster-inspired libations.

Hurricane

Of course. There may be no more appropriate cocktail to whip up at a time like than this than the famous drink that causes Mardi Gras revelers to leave a path of destruction on Bourbon Street.

Dark 'n' Stormy

This classic Caribbean cocktail may have an ominous sounding name but the mix of dark rum and spicy ginger beer couldn't be more pleasant — or easy to make. For more of a unique twist on the drink, try this version, which freezes ginger beer and muddled blackberries into an impressive cube that melts into the rum.

"Adult" Mudslide Milkshake

Mudslides may be a scary side effect often caused by hurricanes, but this spiked milkshake made with Baileys' new mudslide flavor is nothing to be afraid of. (Except for maybe how addictive it is.)

H2O Cocktails

Draw inspiration from all the rain that's in the forecast for this weekend and whip up some light cocktails starring fruit and herb-infused water.

The Gilligan

House-bound thanks to the storm, make like your favorite castaways and kick back with this fruity rum-based cocktail.

Damn-The-Weather Cocktail

Stick it to The (weather) Man with this fittingly named drink that simply mixes gin, sweet vermouth, triple sec, and orange juice.


You Can Cook Using Semen, Apparently

In today’s edition of “Huh. So This Is A Thing”: Cooking. with semen. Yes, you read that right. Semen, as in sperm-carrying human ejaculate, is, apparently, the next great ingredient for the adventurous chef. I’ll give you a moment to process this. OK. Bay-area cookbook author Paul "Fotie" Photenhauer has published two books about recipes that use semen. The first, Natural Harvest: A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes was released in 2008. (I almost wrote “came out in 2008,” but then that seemed too on-the-nose. Evidently, once you start writing about semen-cooking, everything starts sounding dirty.) The description on the back of the book explains,

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients -- you will love this cook book!

Photenhauer followed up Natural Harvest with Semenology: The Semen Bartender’s Handbook in 2013, because what semen-laced meal would be complete without a semen-y cocktail, right?

In an interview with SF Weekly, Photenhauer explains that he doesn’t put semen in all his food, saying, "For me, it's more of a fun twist to add to food … It adds a definite personal twist to it.” Anna Roth at SF Weekly spoke to an infectious disease specialist about the health implications of cooking with semen he explained that certain STIs, including HIV and CMV (a form of herpes), could be transmitted through raw semen, and added, “If the food is thoroughly cooked, well-cooked, to destroy any life forms in the semen, like any viruses. that would be my first concern.” Photenhauer suggests that people shouldn’t cook with the ejaculate of just anyone, remarking, "I would never eat or drink semen, cooked or otherwise, from someone I wouldn't be willing to have sex with." So, the more you know, right?

And on that note, here are some of Photenhauer’s recipes, for those of you who are. er, interested:


You Can Cook Using Semen, Apparently

In today’s edition of “Huh. So This Is A Thing”: Cooking. with semen. Yes, you read that right. Semen, as in sperm-carrying human ejaculate, is, apparently, the next great ingredient for the adventurous chef. I’ll give you a moment to process this. OK. Bay-area cookbook author Paul "Fotie" Photenhauer has published two books about recipes that use semen. The first, Natural Harvest: A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes was released in 2008. (I almost wrote “came out in 2008,” but then that seemed too on-the-nose. Evidently, once you start writing about semen-cooking, everything starts sounding dirty.) The description on the back of the book explains,

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients -- you will love this cook book!

Photenhauer followed up Natural Harvest with Semenology: The Semen Bartender’s Handbook in 2013, because what semen-laced meal would be complete without a semen-y cocktail, right?

In an interview with SF Weekly, Photenhauer explains that he doesn’t put semen in all his food, saying, "For me, it's more of a fun twist to add to food … It adds a definite personal twist to it.” Anna Roth at SF Weekly spoke to an infectious disease specialist about the health implications of cooking with semen he explained that certain STIs, including HIV and CMV (a form of herpes), could be transmitted through raw semen, and added, “If the food is thoroughly cooked, well-cooked, to destroy any life forms in the semen, like any viruses. that would be my first concern.” Photenhauer suggests that people shouldn’t cook with the ejaculate of just anyone, remarking, "I would never eat or drink semen, cooked or otherwise, from someone I wouldn't be willing to have sex with." So, the more you know, right?

And on that note, here are some of Photenhauer’s recipes, for those of you who are. er, interested:


You Can Cook Using Semen, Apparently

In today’s edition of “Huh. So This Is A Thing”: Cooking. with semen. Yes, you read that right. Semen, as in sperm-carrying human ejaculate, is, apparently, the next great ingredient for the adventurous chef. I’ll give you a moment to process this. OK. Bay-area cookbook author Paul "Fotie" Photenhauer has published two books about recipes that use semen. The first, Natural Harvest: A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes was released in 2008. (I almost wrote “came out in 2008,” but then that seemed too on-the-nose. Evidently, once you start writing about semen-cooking, everything starts sounding dirty.) The description on the back of the book explains,

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients -- you will love this cook book!

Photenhauer followed up Natural Harvest with Semenology: The Semen Bartender’s Handbook in 2013, because what semen-laced meal would be complete without a semen-y cocktail, right?

In an interview with SF Weekly, Photenhauer explains that he doesn’t put semen in all his food, saying, "For me, it's more of a fun twist to add to food … It adds a definite personal twist to it.” Anna Roth at SF Weekly spoke to an infectious disease specialist about the health implications of cooking with semen he explained that certain STIs, including HIV and CMV (a form of herpes), could be transmitted through raw semen, and added, “If the food is thoroughly cooked, well-cooked, to destroy any life forms in the semen, like any viruses. that would be my first concern.” Photenhauer suggests that people shouldn’t cook with the ejaculate of just anyone, remarking, "I would never eat or drink semen, cooked or otherwise, from someone I wouldn't be willing to have sex with." So, the more you know, right?

And on that note, here are some of Photenhauer’s recipes, for those of you who are. er, interested:


You Can Cook Using Semen, Apparently

In today’s edition of “Huh. So This Is A Thing”: Cooking. with semen. Yes, you read that right. Semen, as in sperm-carrying human ejaculate, is, apparently, the next great ingredient for the adventurous chef. I’ll give you a moment to process this. OK. Bay-area cookbook author Paul "Fotie" Photenhauer has published two books about recipes that use semen. The first, Natural Harvest: A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes was released in 2008. (I almost wrote “came out in 2008,” but then that seemed too on-the-nose. Evidently, once you start writing about semen-cooking, everything starts sounding dirty.) The description on the back of the book explains,

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients -- you will love this cook book!

Photenhauer followed up Natural Harvest with Semenology: The Semen Bartender’s Handbook in 2013, because what semen-laced meal would be complete without a semen-y cocktail, right?

In an interview with SF Weekly, Photenhauer explains that he doesn’t put semen in all his food, saying, "For me, it's more of a fun twist to add to food … It adds a definite personal twist to it.” Anna Roth at SF Weekly spoke to an infectious disease specialist about the health implications of cooking with semen he explained that certain STIs, including HIV and CMV (a form of herpes), could be transmitted through raw semen, and added, “If the food is thoroughly cooked, well-cooked, to destroy any life forms in the semen, like any viruses. that would be my first concern.” Photenhauer suggests that people shouldn’t cook with the ejaculate of just anyone, remarking, "I would never eat or drink semen, cooked or otherwise, from someone I wouldn't be willing to have sex with." So, the more you know, right?

And on that note, here are some of Photenhauer’s recipes, for those of you who are. er, interested:


You Can Cook Using Semen, Apparently

In today’s edition of “Huh. So This Is A Thing”: Cooking. with semen. Yes, you read that right. Semen, as in sperm-carrying human ejaculate, is, apparently, the next great ingredient for the adventurous chef. I’ll give you a moment to process this. OK. Bay-area cookbook author Paul "Fotie" Photenhauer has published two books about recipes that use semen. The first, Natural Harvest: A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes was released in 2008. (I almost wrote “came out in 2008,” but then that seemed too on-the-nose. Evidently, once you start writing about semen-cooking, everything starts sounding dirty.) The description on the back of the book explains,

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients -- you will love this cook book!

Photenhauer followed up Natural Harvest with Semenology: The Semen Bartender’s Handbook in 2013, because what semen-laced meal would be complete without a semen-y cocktail, right?

In an interview with SF Weekly, Photenhauer explains that he doesn’t put semen in all his food, saying, "For me, it's more of a fun twist to add to food … It adds a definite personal twist to it.” Anna Roth at SF Weekly spoke to an infectious disease specialist about the health implications of cooking with semen he explained that certain STIs, including HIV and CMV (a form of herpes), could be transmitted through raw semen, and added, “If the food is thoroughly cooked, well-cooked, to destroy any life forms in the semen, like any viruses. that would be my first concern.” Photenhauer suggests that people shouldn’t cook with the ejaculate of just anyone, remarking, "I would never eat or drink semen, cooked or otherwise, from someone I wouldn't be willing to have sex with." So, the more you know, right?

And on that note, here are some of Photenhauer’s recipes, for those of you who are. er, interested:


You Can Cook Using Semen, Apparently

In today’s edition of “Huh. So This Is A Thing”: Cooking. with semen. Yes, you read that right. Semen, as in sperm-carrying human ejaculate, is, apparently, the next great ingredient for the adventurous chef. I’ll give you a moment to process this. OK. Bay-area cookbook author Paul "Fotie" Photenhauer has published two books about recipes that use semen. The first, Natural Harvest: A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes was released in 2008. (I almost wrote “came out in 2008,” but then that seemed too on-the-nose. Evidently, once you start writing about semen-cooking, everything starts sounding dirty.) The description on the back of the book explains,

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients -- you will love this cook book!

Photenhauer followed up Natural Harvest with Semenology: The Semen Bartender’s Handbook in 2013, because what semen-laced meal would be complete without a semen-y cocktail, right?

In an interview with SF Weekly, Photenhauer explains that he doesn’t put semen in all his food, saying, "For me, it's more of a fun twist to add to food … It adds a definite personal twist to it.” Anna Roth at SF Weekly spoke to an infectious disease specialist about the health implications of cooking with semen he explained that certain STIs, including HIV and CMV (a form of herpes), could be transmitted through raw semen, and added, “If the food is thoroughly cooked, well-cooked, to destroy any life forms in the semen, like any viruses. that would be my first concern.” Photenhauer suggests that people shouldn’t cook with the ejaculate of just anyone, remarking, "I would never eat or drink semen, cooked or otherwise, from someone I wouldn't be willing to have sex with." So, the more you know, right?

And on that note, here are some of Photenhauer’s recipes, for those of you who are. er, interested:


You Can Cook Using Semen, Apparently

In today’s edition of “Huh. So This Is A Thing”: Cooking. with semen. Yes, you read that right. Semen, as in sperm-carrying human ejaculate, is, apparently, the next great ingredient for the adventurous chef. I’ll give you a moment to process this. OK. Bay-area cookbook author Paul "Fotie" Photenhauer has published two books about recipes that use semen. The first, Natural Harvest: A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes was released in 2008. (I almost wrote “came out in 2008,” but then that seemed too on-the-nose. Evidently, once you start writing about semen-cooking, everything starts sounding dirty.) The description on the back of the book explains,

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients -- you will love this cook book!

Photenhauer followed up Natural Harvest with Semenology: The Semen Bartender’s Handbook in 2013, because what semen-laced meal would be complete without a semen-y cocktail, right?

In an interview with SF Weekly, Photenhauer explains that he doesn’t put semen in all his food, saying, "For me, it's more of a fun twist to add to food … It adds a definite personal twist to it.” Anna Roth at SF Weekly spoke to an infectious disease specialist about the health implications of cooking with semen he explained that certain STIs, including HIV and CMV (a form of herpes), could be transmitted through raw semen, and added, “If the food is thoroughly cooked, well-cooked, to destroy any life forms in the semen, like any viruses. that would be my first concern.” Photenhauer suggests that people shouldn’t cook with the ejaculate of just anyone, remarking, "I would never eat or drink semen, cooked or otherwise, from someone I wouldn't be willing to have sex with." So, the more you know, right?

And on that note, here are some of Photenhauer’s recipes, for those of you who are. er, interested:


You Can Cook Using Semen, Apparently

In today’s edition of “Huh. So This Is A Thing”: Cooking. with semen. Yes, you read that right. Semen, as in sperm-carrying human ejaculate, is, apparently, the next great ingredient for the adventurous chef. I’ll give you a moment to process this. OK. Bay-area cookbook author Paul "Fotie" Photenhauer has published two books about recipes that use semen. The first, Natural Harvest: A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes was released in 2008. (I almost wrote “came out in 2008,” but then that seemed too on-the-nose. Evidently, once you start writing about semen-cooking, everything starts sounding dirty.) The description on the back of the book explains,

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients -- you will love this cook book!

Photenhauer followed up Natural Harvest with Semenology: The Semen Bartender’s Handbook in 2013, because what semen-laced meal would be complete without a semen-y cocktail, right?

In an interview with SF Weekly, Photenhauer explains that he doesn’t put semen in all his food, saying, "For me, it's more of a fun twist to add to food … It adds a definite personal twist to it.” Anna Roth at SF Weekly spoke to an infectious disease specialist about the health implications of cooking with semen he explained that certain STIs, including HIV and CMV (a form of herpes), could be transmitted through raw semen, and added, “If the food is thoroughly cooked, well-cooked, to destroy any life forms in the semen, like any viruses. that would be my first concern.” Photenhauer suggests that people shouldn’t cook with the ejaculate of just anyone, remarking, "I would never eat or drink semen, cooked or otherwise, from someone I wouldn't be willing to have sex with." So, the more you know, right?

And on that note, here are some of Photenhauer’s recipes, for those of you who are. er, interested:


You Can Cook Using Semen, Apparently

In today’s edition of “Huh. So This Is A Thing”: Cooking. with semen. Yes, you read that right. Semen, as in sperm-carrying human ejaculate, is, apparently, the next great ingredient for the adventurous chef. I’ll give you a moment to process this. OK. Bay-area cookbook author Paul "Fotie" Photenhauer has published two books about recipes that use semen. The first, Natural Harvest: A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes was released in 2008. (I almost wrote “came out in 2008,” but then that seemed too on-the-nose. Evidently, once you start writing about semen-cooking, everything starts sounding dirty.) The description on the back of the book explains,

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients -- you will love this cook book!

Photenhauer followed up Natural Harvest with Semenology: The Semen Bartender’s Handbook in 2013, because what semen-laced meal would be complete without a semen-y cocktail, right?

In an interview with SF Weekly, Photenhauer explains that he doesn’t put semen in all his food, saying, "For me, it's more of a fun twist to add to food … It adds a definite personal twist to it.” Anna Roth at SF Weekly spoke to an infectious disease specialist about the health implications of cooking with semen he explained that certain STIs, including HIV and CMV (a form of herpes), could be transmitted through raw semen, and added, “If the food is thoroughly cooked, well-cooked, to destroy any life forms in the semen, like any viruses. that would be my first concern.” Photenhauer suggests that people shouldn’t cook with the ejaculate of just anyone, remarking, "I would never eat or drink semen, cooked or otherwise, from someone I wouldn't be willing to have sex with." So, the more you know, right?

And on that note, here are some of Photenhauer’s recipes, for those of you who are. er, interested:


You Can Cook Using Semen, Apparently

In today’s edition of “Huh. So This Is A Thing”: Cooking. with semen. Yes, you read that right. Semen, as in sperm-carrying human ejaculate, is, apparently, the next great ingredient for the adventurous chef. I’ll give you a moment to process this. OK. Bay-area cookbook author Paul "Fotie" Photenhauer has published two books about recipes that use semen. The first, Natural Harvest: A Collection of Semen-Based Recipes was released in 2008. (I almost wrote “came out in 2008,” but then that seemed too on-the-nose. Evidently, once you start writing about semen-cooking, everything starts sounding dirty.) The description on the back of the book explains,

Semen is not only nutritious, but it also has a wonderful texture and amazing cooking properties. Like fine wine and cheeses, the taste of semen is complex and dynamic. Semen is inexpensive to produce and is commonly available in many, if not most, homes and restaurants. Despite all of these positive qualities, semen remains neglected as a food.

This book hopes to change that.

Once you overcome any initial hesitation, you will be surprised to learn how wonderful semen is in the kitchen. Semen is an exciting ingredient that can give every dish you make an interesting twist. If you are a passionate cook and are not afraid to experiment with new ingredients -- you will love this cook book!

Photenhauer followed up Natural Harvest with Semenology: The Semen Bartender’s Handbook in 2013, because what semen-laced meal would be complete without a semen-y cocktail, right?

In an interview with SF Weekly, Photenhauer explains that he doesn’t put semen in all his food, saying, "For me, it's more of a fun twist to add to food … It adds a definite personal twist to it.” Anna Roth at SF Weekly spoke to an infectious disease specialist about the health implications of cooking with semen he explained that certain STIs, including HIV and CMV (a form of herpes), could be transmitted through raw semen, and added, “If the food is thoroughly cooked, well-cooked, to destroy any life forms in the semen, like any viruses. that would be my first concern.” Photenhauer suggests that people shouldn’t cook with the ejaculate of just anyone, remarking, "I would never eat or drink semen, cooked or otherwise, from someone I wouldn't be willing to have sex with." So, the more you know, right?

And on that note, here are some of Photenhauer’s recipes, for those of you who are. er, interested: