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Restaurants and Coronavirus: This Is What People Miss Most About Eating Out

Restaurants and Coronavirus: This Is What People Miss Most About Eating Out



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As some states reopen restaurants for dine-in, a recent survey found the top reason people want to return to restaurants and bars has less to do with the food they eat than the feeling the dine-in experience brings.

Popular Coronavirus Quarantine Cocktails By State

Datassential surveyed 4,000 consumers in the U.S. on what they miss the most about restaurants during the age of statewide stay-at-home orders and social distancing. In response to the question, “what are your top reasons for wanting to visit restaurants and bars again,” two responses tied for the most popular.

Forty-one percent of respondents reported wanting to visit food establishments so they can support local restaurants. Another 41% reported wanting to visit reopened restaurants and bars to feel some sort of normalcy.

The restaurant industry has been among the hardest hit during the pandemic. The industry alone reported 5.5 million job losses in April. Altogether, dining establishments are expected to lose $240 billion in sales in 2020.

Even once restaurants reopen to diners, the dine-in experience may never fully return to how it once was. Large chains like Burger King and Popeyes have already floated the idea of turning off self-serve soda machines for good and adding face masks to the regular uniform.

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Still, being able to gather with loved ones over a meal in a communal space will nevertheless be a welcome change of pace after months of online cooking classes and everyone’s homemade bread taking over your socials. Along with missing the social parts of the dine-in experience, there’s much more diners miss about restaurants during coronavirus quarantine.


Best Restaurant Cities: 15 U.S. Metro Areas With The Most Eateries Per Capita

What's the most restaurant-crazy city in the country?

Maybe. San Francisco? New York? New Orleans? All are great cities for dining, with some of the most acclaimed and beloved restaurants in the world, but none of them even merit a medal in the restaurant city Olympics judged by a new measure of dining density, published here for the first time.

HuffPost Food used data from The NPD Group's annual ReCount survey, which takes a yearly census of the number of restaurants in the country, to rank United States metropolitan areas by the number of restaurants per capita. Click through below to find out the results of our number crunching:

One important note: The NPD Group broke its findings into metropolitan areas larger than the ones used by the Census Bureau or the one comparable study of restaurants per capita, which was conducted by Trulia. So it's possible that the list favored sprawling, low-density areas in the West, where cities are few and far between, compared to more tightly-packed regions such as New England.

Like the Trulia list, it leans a little heavily toward touristy areas, which tend to attract many more restaurant customers than full-time residents. Still, it's a fascinating, unusual list. Who knew Alaskans liked to eat out so much?

(Also, for the record, because we know based on lists like this we've done in the past that it'll come up in the comments, New Orleans was at number 46, right between Los Angeles and San Angelo, Texas. Sorry guys. We love eating there, too.)

To put the numbers on there in perspective, the NPD Group's ReCount Census for Fall 2012 indicated that there are now 616,008 restaurants operating in the country, up .7 percent from the year before. That means that the average density in the country is about 20 restaurants per 10,000 people.


Best Restaurant Cities: 15 U.S. Metro Areas With The Most Eateries Per Capita

What's the most restaurant-crazy city in the country?

Maybe. San Francisco? New York? New Orleans? All are great cities for dining, with some of the most acclaimed and beloved restaurants in the world, but none of them even merit a medal in the restaurant city Olympics judged by a new measure of dining density, published here for the first time.

HuffPost Food used data from The NPD Group's annual ReCount survey, which takes a yearly census of the number of restaurants in the country, to rank United States metropolitan areas by the number of restaurants per capita. Click through below to find out the results of our number crunching:

One important note: The NPD Group broke its findings into metropolitan areas larger than the ones used by the Census Bureau or the one comparable study of restaurants per capita, which was conducted by Trulia. So it's possible that the list favored sprawling, low-density areas in the West, where cities are few and far between, compared to more tightly-packed regions such as New England.

Like the Trulia list, it leans a little heavily toward touristy areas, which tend to attract many more restaurant customers than full-time residents. Still, it's a fascinating, unusual list. Who knew Alaskans liked to eat out so much?

(Also, for the record, because we know based on lists like this we've done in the past that it'll come up in the comments, New Orleans was at number 46, right between Los Angeles and San Angelo, Texas. Sorry guys. We love eating there, too.)

To put the numbers on there in perspective, the NPD Group's ReCount Census for Fall 2012 indicated that there are now 616,008 restaurants operating in the country, up .7 percent from the year before. That means that the average density in the country is about 20 restaurants per 10,000 people.


Best Restaurant Cities: 15 U.S. Metro Areas With The Most Eateries Per Capita

What's the most restaurant-crazy city in the country?

Maybe. San Francisco? New York? New Orleans? All are great cities for dining, with some of the most acclaimed and beloved restaurants in the world, but none of them even merit a medal in the restaurant city Olympics judged by a new measure of dining density, published here for the first time.

HuffPost Food used data from The NPD Group's annual ReCount survey, which takes a yearly census of the number of restaurants in the country, to rank United States metropolitan areas by the number of restaurants per capita. Click through below to find out the results of our number crunching:

One important note: The NPD Group broke its findings into metropolitan areas larger than the ones used by the Census Bureau or the one comparable study of restaurants per capita, which was conducted by Trulia. So it's possible that the list favored sprawling, low-density areas in the West, where cities are few and far between, compared to more tightly-packed regions such as New England.

Like the Trulia list, it leans a little heavily toward touristy areas, which tend to attract many more restaurant customers than full-time residents. Still, it's a fascinating, unusual list. Who knew Alaskans liked to eat out so much?

(Also, for the record, because we know based on lists like this we've done in the past that it'll come up in the comments, New Orleans was at number 46, right between Los Angeles and San Angelo, Texas. Sorry guys. We love eating there, too.)

To put the numbers on there in perspective, the NPD Group's ReCount Census for Fall 2012 indicated that there are now 616,008 restaurants operating in the country, up .7 percent from the year before. That means that the average density in the country is about 20 restaurants per 10,000 people.


Best Restaurant Cities: 15 U.S. Metro Areas With The Most Eateries Per Capita

What's the most restaurant-crazy city in the country?

Maybe. San Francisco? New York? New Orleans? All are great cities for dining, with some of the most acclaimed and beloved restaurants in the world, but none of them even merit a medal in the restaurant city Olympics judged by a new measure of dining density, published here for the first time.

HuffPost Food used data from The NPD Group's annual ReCount survey, which takes a yearly census of the number of restaurants in the country, to rank United States metropolitan areas by the number of restaurants per capita. Click through below to find out the results of our number crunching:

One important note: The NPD Group broke its findings into metropolitan areas larger than the ones used by the Census Bureau or the one comparable study of restaurants per capita, which was conducted by Trulia. So it's possible that the list favored sprawling, low-density areas in the West, where cities are few and far between, compared to more tightly-packed regions such as New England.

Like the Trulia list, it leans a little heavily toward touristy areas, which tend to attract many more restaurant customers than full-time residents. Still, it's a fascinating, unusual list. Who knew Alaskans liked to eat out so much?

(Also, for the record, because we know based on lists like this we've done in the past that it'll come up in the comments, New Orleans was at number 46, right between Los Angeles and San Angelo, Texas. Sorry guys. We love eating there, too.)

To put the numbers on there in perspective, the NPD Group's ReCount Census for Fall 2012 indicated that there are now 616,008 restaurants operating in the country, up .7 percent from the year before. That means that the average density in the country is about 20 restaurants per 10,000 people.


Best Restaurant Cities: 15 U.S. Metro Areas With The Most Eateries Per Capita

What's the most restaurant-crazy city in the country?

Maybe. San Francisco? New York? New Orleans? All are great cities for dining, with some of the most acclaimed and beloved restaurants in the world, but none of them even merit a medal in the restaurant city Olympics judged by a new measure of dining density, published here for the first time.

HuffPost Food used data from The NPD Group's annual ReCount survey, which takes a yearly census of the number of restaurants in the country, to rank United States metropolitan areas by the number of restaurants per capita. Click through below to find out the results of our number crunching:

One important note: The NPD Group broke its findings into metropolitan areas larger than the ones used by the Census Bureau or the one comparable study of restaurants per capita, which was conducted by Trulia. So it's possible that the list favored sprawling, low-density areas in the West, where cities are few and far between, compared to more tightly-packed regions such as New England.

Like the Trulia list, it leans a little heavily toward touristy areas, which tend to attract many more restaurant customers than full-time residents. Still, it's a fascinating, unusual list. Who knew Alaskans liked to eat out so much?

(Also, for the record, because we know based on lists like this we've done in the past that it'll come up in the comments, New Orleans was at number 46, right between Los Angeles and San Angelo, Texas. Sorry guys. We love eating there, too.)

To put the numbers on there in perspective, the NPD Group's ReCount Census for Fall 2012 indicated that there are now 616,008 restaurants operating in the country, up .7 percent from the year before. That means that the average density in the country is about 20 restaurants per 10,000 people.


Best Restaurant Cities: 15 U.S. Metro Areas With The Most Eateries Per Capita

What's the most restaurant-crazy city in the country?

Maybe. San Francisco? New York? New Orleans? All are great cities for dining, with some of the most acclaimed and beloved restaurants in the world, but none of them even merit a medal in the restaurant city Olympics judged by a new measure of dining density, published here for the first time.

HuffPost Food used data from The NPD Group's annual ReCount survey, which takes a yearly census of the number of restaurants in the country, to rank United States metropolitan areas by the number of restaurants per capita. Click through below to find out the results of our number crunching:

One important note: The NPD Group broke its findings into metropolitan areas larger than the ones used by the Census Bureau or the one comparable study of restaurants per capita, which was conducted by Trulia. So it's possible that the list favored sprawling, low-density areas in the West, where cities are few and far between, compared to more tightly-packed regions such as New England.

Like the Trulia list, it leans a little heavily toward touristy areas, which tend to attract many more restaurant customers than full-time residents. Still, it's a fascinating, unusual list. Who knew Alaskans liked to eat out so much?

(Also, for the record, because we know based on lists like this we've done in the past that it'll come up in the comments, New Orleans was at number 46, right between Los Angeles and San Angelo, Texas. Sorry guys. We love eating there, too.)

To put the numbers on there in perspective, the NPD Group's ReCount Census for Fall 2012 indicated that there are now 616,008 restaurants operating in the country, up .7 percent from the year before. That means that the average density in the country is about 20 restaurants per 10,000 people.


Best Restaurant Cities: 15 U.S. Metro Areas With The Most Eateries Per Capita

What's the most restaurant-crazy city in the country?

Maybe. San Francisco? New York? New Orleans? All are great cities for dining, with some of the most acclaimed and beloved restaurants in the world, but none of them even merit a medal in the restaurant city Olympics judged by a new measure of dining density, published here for the first time.

HuffPost Food used data from The NPD Group's annual ReCount survey, which takes a yearly census of the number of restaurants in the country, to rank United States metropolitan areas by the number of restaurants per capita. Click through below to find out the results of our number crunching:

One important note: The NPD Group broke its findings into metropolitan areas larger than the ones used by the Census Bureau or the one comparable study of restaurants per capita, which was conducted by Trulia. So it's possible that the list favored sprawling, low-density areas in the West, where cities are few and far between, compared to more tightly-packed regions such as New England.

Like the Trulia list, it leans a little heavily toward touristy areas, which tend to attract many more restaurant customers than full-time residents. Still, it's a fascinating, unusual list. Who knew Alaskans liked to eat out so much?

(Also, for the record, because we know based on lists like this we've done in the past that it'll come up in the comments, New Orleans was at number 46, right between Los Angeles and San Angelo, Texas. Sorry guys. We love eating there, too.)

To put the numbers on there in perspective, the NPD Group's ReCount Census for Fall 2012 indicated that there are now 616,008 restaurants operating in the country, up .7 percent from the year before. That means that the average density in the country is about 20 restaurants per 10,000 people.


Best Restaurant Cities: 15 U.S. Metro Areas With The Most Eateries Per Capita

What's the most restaurant-crazy city in the country?

Maybe. San Francisco? New York? New Orleans? All are great cities for dining, with some of the most acclaimed and beloved restaurants in the world, but none of them even merit a medal in the restaurant city Olympics judged by a new measure of dining density, published here for the first time.

HuffPost Food used data from The NPD Group's annual ReCount survey, which takes a yearly census of the number of restaurants in the country, to rank United States metropolitan areas by the number of restaurants per capita. Click through below to find out the results of our number crunching:

One important note: The NPD Group broke its findings into metropolitan areas larger than the ones used by the Census Bureau or the one comparable study of restaurants per capita, which was conducted by Trulia. So it's possible that the list favored sprawling, low-density areas in the West, where cities are few and far between, compared to more tightly-packed regions such as New England.

Like the Trulia list, it leans a little heavily toward touristy areas, which tend to attract many more restaurant customers than full-time residents. Still, it's a fascinating, unusual list. Who knew Alaskans liked to eat out so much?

(Also, for the record, because we know based on lists like this we've done in the past that it'll come up in the comments, New Orleans was at number 46, right between Los Angeles and San Angelo, Texas. Sorry guys. We love eating there, too.)

To put the numbers on there in perspective, the NPD Group's ReCount Census for Fall 2012 indicated that there are now 616,008 restaurants operating in the country, up .7 percent from the year before. That means that the average density in the country is about 20 restaurants per 10,000 people.


Best Restaurant Cities: 15 U.S. Metro Areas With The Most Eateries Per Capita

What's the most restaurant-crazy city in the country?

Maybe. San Francisco? New York? New Orleans? All are great cities for dining, with some of the most acclaimed and beloved restaurants in the world, but none of them even merit a medal in the restaurant city Olympics judged by a new measure of dining density, published here for the first time.

HuffPost Food used data from The NPD Group's annual ReCount survey, which takes a yearly census of the number of restaurants in the country, to rank United States metropolitan areas by the number of restaurants per capita. Click through below to find out the results of our number crunching:

One important note: The NPD Group broke its findings into metropolitan areas larger than the ones used by the Census Bureau or the one comparable study of restaurants per capita, which was conducted by Trulia. So it's possible that the list favored sprawling, low-density areas in the West, where cities are few and far between, compared to more tightly-packed regions such as New England.

Like the Trulia list, it leans a little heavily toward touristy areas, which tend to attract many more restaurant customers than full-time residents. Still, it's a fascinating, unusual list. Who knew Alaskans liked to eat out so much?

(Also, for the record, because we know based on lists like this we've done in the past that it'll come up in the comments, New Orleans was at number 46, right between Los Angeles and San Angelo, Texas. Sorry guys. We love eating there, too.)

To put the numbers on there in perspective, the NPD Group's ReCount Census for Fall 2012 indicated that there are now 616,008 restaurants operating in the country, up .7 percent from the year before. That means that the average density in the country is about 20 restaurants per 10,000 people.


Best Restaurant Cities: 15 U.S. Metro Areas With The Most Eateries Per Capita

What's the most restaurant-crazy city in the country?

Maybe. San Francisco? New York? New Orleans? All are great cities for dining, with some of the most acclaimed and beloved restaurants in the world, but none of them even merit a medal in the restaurant city Olympics judged by a new measure of dining density, published here for the first time.

HuffPost Food used data from The NPD Group's annual ReCount survey, which takes a yearly census of the number of restaurants in the country, to rank United States metropolitan areas by the number of restaurants per capita. Click through below to find out the results of our number crunching:

One important note: The NPD Group broke its findings into metropolitan areas larger than the ones used by the Census Bureau or the one comparable study of restaurants per capita, which was conducted by Trulia. So it's possible that the list favored sprawling, low-density areas in the West, where cities are few and far between, compared to more tightly-packed regions such as New England.

Like the Trulia list, it leans a little heavily toward touristy areas, which tend to attract many more restaurant customers than full-time residents. Still, it's a fascinating, unusual list. Who knew Alaskans liked to eat out so much?

(Also, for the record, because we know based on lists like this we've done in the past that it'll come up in the comments, New Orleans was at number 46, right between Los Angeles and San Angelo, Texas. Sorry guys. We love eating there, too.)

To put the numbers on there in perspective, the NPD Group's ReCount Census for Fall 2012 indicated that there are now 616,008 restaurants operating in the country, up .7 percent from the year before. That means that the average density in the country is about 20 restaurants per 10,000 people.